Read The City Where We Once Lived by Eric Barnes Online

the-city-where-we-once-lived

In a near future where climate change has severely affected weather and agriculture, the North End of an unnamed city has long been abandoned in favor of the neighboring South End. Aside from the scavengers steadily stripping the empty city to its bones, only a few thousand people remain, content to live quietly among the crumbling metropolis. Many, like the narrator, areIn a near future where climate change has severely affected weather and agriculture, the North End of an unnamed city has long been abandoned in favor of the neighboring South End. Aside from the scavengers steadily stripping the empty city to its bones, only a few thousand people remain, content to live quietly among the crumbling metropolis. Many, like the narrator, are there to try to escape the demons of their past. He spends his time observing and recording the decay around him, attempting to bury memories of what he has lost. But it eventually becomes clear that things are unraveling elsewhere as well, as strangers, violent and desperate alike, begin to appear in the North End, spreading word of social and political deterioration in the South End and beyond. Faced with a growing disruption to his isolated life, the narrator discovers within himself a surprising need to resist losing the home he has created in this empty place. He and the rest of the citizens of the North End must choose whether to face outsiders as invaders or welcome them as neighbors. The City Where We Once Lived is a haunting novel of the near future that combines a prescient look at how climate change and industrial flight will shape our world with a deeply personal story of one man running from his past. With glowing prose, Eric Barnes brings into sharp focus questions of how we come to call a place home and what is our capacity for violence when that home becomes threatened....

Title : The City Where We Once Lived
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781628728835
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 272 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The City Where We Once Lived Reviews

  • Emma Rund
    2018-10-04 14:29

    The City Where We Once Lived is a slow burning story of rebirth. I have to admit I did not like the first quarter of this book, but I'm really glad I pushed through because it payed off. I read the last quarter of the book in one sitting and I had to choke back tears in several painful, hard hitting moments, that only payed off because of the slow development. If you enjoy dystopian stories I would definitely recommend picking this up. The pacing is similar to the pacing in a Margaret Atwood novel if that means anything to you. Thank you to Skyhorse publishing for the digital arc :) (Yes, this is still an honest review)

  • Bob H
    2018-10-18 12:24

    The narrator, who doesn't seem to have a name, lives in a deserted city, North End, with the thousand or so remaining people. It's a crumbling city, with sometimes-violent weather, but otherwise quiet; the utilities still seem to work in most places, though the levees are slowly giving way to rising water. This novel is not a thriller; the great disaster is already well under way, the narrator's family is dead, and the town is mostly abandoned in favor of South End. The people remaining in North End keep mostly to themselves (although the narrator does set abandoned houses on fire now and then).Gradually, though, the outside world does creep in. Almost all the plants in North End are dead, and word comes in that it's a world wide phenomenon, "the death of things," they call it. The climate is bad in other places -- violent storms in North End and South End, drought elsewhere -- and the overall sense is of creeping decay. South End connects to North End only by one overpass, so word of increasing dysfunction, violence, institutional failure in South End creeps in, and the survivors in North End, who live by scavenging mostly, have some decisions to make.It's a thoughtful look at a crumbled world, a creeping dystopia, a story in which the reader becomes an inhabitant, rather than a spectator. It's a story that requires patience, but it's a story of endurance far more than conflict. High recommendation.

  • Viva
    2018-10-17 11:23

    Low key, bland, slow, depressing and pointless. I think the author did a great job of setting up the background. I really felt as if I lived in the North End itself and lived a pointless life like one of the inhabitants. However, I think the author could have done a better job of making me interested in the narrator. This is a book which doesn't draw me along, I make myself read it. I don't look forward to reading it, I look forward to finishing it. There were a few high points along the way, but that's all they were, islands in a sea of depression. In terms of setting the mood of the book, this was great. In terms of entertainment, not so much. This rating of 2 stars is what I feel, it may not be what you feel about it.I got this as a free ARC.

  • Kelli
    2018-10-20 16:34

    Wonderful. For fans of Emily St Mandel’s Station Eleven, a quiet, reflective look at the people who stay when a civilization crumbles.

  • Eric
    2018-10-09 18:48