Read two the 2nd annual stupefying stories horror special by Bruce Bethke Evan Dicken José Pablo Iriarte Rose Blackthorn Rebecca Roland Stone Showers Yukimi Ogawa Keith Rosson Online

two-the-2nd-annual-stupefying-stories-horror-special

Welcome to TWO, the second annual horror special from Stupefying Stories. This time out we're bringing you one of the biggest and best collections we've ever assembled, containing sixteen fresh and exciting new tales of ghosties and ghoulies, vampires and zombies, monsters and mayhem, and things that go bump in the night! Includes: "Second to Last Stop" by Evan Dicken, "CaWelcome to TWO, the second annual horror special from Stupefying Stories. This time out we're bringing you one of the biggest and best collections we've ever assembled, containing sixteen fresh and exciting new tales of ghosties and ghoulies, vampires and zombies, monsters and mayhem, and things that go bump in the night! Includes: "Second to Last Stop" by Evan Dicken, "Cabrón" by Jóse Iriarte, "Blood and Water" by Rose Blackthorn, "Gris-Gris for a Mal Pris" by Rebecca Roland, "Zombie Angst, or How to Pair Human Brains With a Good Chianti" by Stone Showers, "Wall" by Yukimi Ogawa, "A is for Android" by Holly A. Cave, "The Things That Perish Along The Way" by Keith Rosson, "Choice" by Shona Snowden, "Offworld" by Anton Sim, "An Incident in Cain's Mark" by L. Joseph Shosty, "Professor Pandemonium's Train of Terror" by Simon Kewin, "It Came From Hell And Smashed The Angels" by Gregor Xane, "The Waiting Line (Many Elbows)" by Leah Thomas, "The Revenge of Oscar Wilde" by Sean Eads, and "Eulogy to be Given by Whoever's Still Sober" by Nicole Cushing. STUPEFYING STORIES: It's the great new horror reading you've been looking for!...

Title : two the 2nd annual stupefying stories horror special
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 18753586
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 185 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

two the 2nd annual stupefying stories horror special Reviews

  • Evans Light
    2018-10-18 11:00

    Picked this up from Amazon. Looking forward to seeing what it has in store, especially from Gregor Xane...My 5-star rating is for this one story at the moment. I'll update this review as I read other selections.***** IT CAME FROM HELL AND SMASHED THE ANGELS, by Gregor XaneKnowing Gregor from Goodreads - and not having read his work before - I have to admit I was approaching this story with a little bit of trepidation. What if I didn't like it? What if it was downright, *cough*, awful?I shouldn't have worried.This story grabbed me from the moment I saw the title in the table of contents: IT CAME FROM HELL AND SMASHED THE ANGELS. That's one hell of a cool title.And this is one hell of a cool story, that oozes easy style and is written with the assurance of a voice that seems to have been writing for years. I'm beyond impressed. This is a very professional tale.Big Benjamin Coburn is a has-been low-budget movie "star", never handsome enough for leading roles, but big and scary enough to play psychos and heavies.Those days are behind him now, however, and he wiles away the days in his run-down trailer just waiting for something, anything, to happen.One night, not willing to wait anymore, wasting his life sitting around listening to the bickering of his landlords across the way, he just says "fuck it all", gets on his bike and leaves it all behind.Then things really do start to happen.This is a story with genuine vibe, it feels authentic and cool, not put-on in the least. The prose is simple, smooth and effective. And the best thing about it is that it just moves. I could almost feel the wind in my hair as I read.Gregor Xane, you've earned yourself a fan. Keep 'em coming!I look forward to seeing if the other authors in this book can come close to matching the quality of this story. If so, I found myself a winner.

  • Gregor Xane
    2018-11-15 06:05

    Yes, I do have a story in this anthology. So take this review for whatever you think it's worth. And, incidentally, I don't personally know the editor or any of the contributors. I've not interacted with any of the other authors electronically or otherwise. My reading of their works, and this work as a whole, I would say, is relatively unbiased. I don't know. Maybe not. Either way, it's not going to stop me from typing out my overall impressions and pointing out which stories were, to me, the stand-outs.This is a varied collection of horror stories. There is a fairly wide range of styles and supernatural beasties represented here. It's a digital-only publication and the eBook formatting is clean and professional.I found every story in this volume entertaining, but the ones I liked the best were (not ranked):"Second to Last Stop" by Evan Dicken(This was a perfect story to open this book. It focuses on a character archetype common in horror films, one that rarely gets a chance to take center stage.)"Gris-Gris for a Mal Pris" by Rebecca Roland(The handling of folk magic in this story was idiosyncratic and very believable.)"A is for Android" by Holly A. Cave(The sense of dread in this one was there on page one and never went away. Plus, robots! Well, androids.)"Offworld" by Anton Sim(Short and sinister with lots of really good little creatures.)"An Incident in Cain's Mark" by L. Joseph Shosty(Lovecraftian Steampunk! And a robot! Er, automaton?)"Professor Pandemonium's Train of Terror" by Simon Kewin(This wry little piece was clever and quick and had all the monsters.)"The Revenge of Oscar Wilde" by Sean Eads(I'm not much for zombies. And I really don't care for the "historical figure versus supernatural creature" sub-genre. But these prejudices didn't stop me from thoroughly enjoying this piece. Good writing can make almost anything good, I suppose. And the ending was just fantastic.)I'm sure others will disagree with my selections above and have their own favorites. And I wouldn't be surprised if they did. As mentioned above, I was entertained by every story here. It's all good stuff.And, of course, I recommend this anthology to fans of short horror fiction, especially those who like their horror with a bit of a retro feel.

  • Joel Kleehammer
    2018-11-05 07:04

    I bought this book after reading Gregor Xane's Six Dead Spots. I was waiting for his new book The Hanover Block, and I wanted to read some more from this talented new-comer. He was the only author in this book that I read previously.The book is not disappointing, although it goes from really good to pretty alright. Occasional typos were annoying, but you can deal with them. There were some things not caught by people or grammar check, but this is self-publishing, so that happens. It was a fun and fast read, with stories that were all a good length, for the most part. They were not too deep or too shallow.Below are my random thoughts on the stories, should you care..."Second to Last Stop" by Evan Dicken: Confusing…I see what was happening, but why? The story was maybe a little too short, and there were no answers. I just didn’t have enough to go on. I felt like something was lacking."Cabrón" by Jóse Iriarte: Not a bad story, with an interesting take on magic and religion. There was some basic Spanish used, but it was always followed with the same word(s) in English, like an episode of Handy Manny. I think the characters would have been speaking in Spanish in any case, so making it in English with some Spanish thrown in was probably just not necessary, except for the effect."Blood and Water" by Rose Blackthorn: This story was very clever, and the author did a great job with storytelling. It had a really good ending."Gris-Gris for a Mal Pris" by Rebecca Roland: I think this one had the most typos. Other than that, this was another great job a storytelling. There wasn’t too little or too much, and I enjoyed the read."Zombie Angst, or How to Pair Human Brains with a Good Chianti" by Stone Showers: I love zombies. I mean, I really, really, really love zombies. The story grabbed me from the very first sentence. Then it grabbed me from the first paragraph. It's great all the way through."Wall" by Yukimi Ogawa: This was a great look at the afterlife in a short burst. After all, what do ghosts do with their spare time? What do they talk about with other ghosts? Why do they haunt a place (or at least seam to haunt a place)?"A is for Android" by Holly A. Cave: I kept thinking that the story was moving at a good pace, but where was it heading? I got really close to the end, but it appeared to have no ending. BAM! The ending hits you when you figure it out to late to avoid it, like an oncoming train. This was a great story. There was just enough background to keep you going but not too much to make it long and boring."The Things That Perish Along the Way" by Keith Rosson: I just couldn’t feel like I was there. I think it lacked in storytelling and scene setting. There was a lack of good grammar. I suppose it was supposed to be like someone thinking, but it was not smooth reading. There were too many fragments and quirky Stephen King-like statements. It was choppy and, so far, the worst story."Choice" by Shona Snowden: This story was fascinating and thought provoking. There were zombies, vampires, and werewolves, oh my. Anything with zombies is good, but this was better than average."Offworld" by Anton Sim: This was short, sweet, and to the point. It was a little short on explanation, but maybe it's for the best. It had a funny ending that I really appreciated."An Incident in Cain's Mark" by L. Joseph Shosty: Okay, Shosty, I ask: what can't be cured by stout drink? The storytelling was reminiscent of Poe or Shelley. It was very "Old Worldy," though it was set in the U.S. It was cleverly written. The story sucks you in and holds you. The ending grabs you."Professor Pandemonium's Train of Terror" by Simon Kewin: This was both dark and creepy but fun. This was another example of good storytelling. It was, overall, a good read."It Came From Hell and Smashed the Angels" by Gregor Xane: Finally…This was the one reason I bought the book. Who the? What the? Just when you think you know where it's going, two things happen. First, you’re wrong, and second, it's over. The end. Deal with what you just read. How do you process that? Great story - the best so far. The name is clever, and it’s even more clever by the end. Great job by Xane, who never fails to deliver."The Waiting Line (Many Elbows)" by Leah Thomas: This had not altogether bad writing, but why? I realized when I finished that I was glad it was short. If that had been a longer story, I would have felt that it was a waste of time. What was that (the thing)? Where did it come from? What does it do? I was left with too many questions and not enough enjoyment."The Revenge of Oscar Wilde" by Sean Eads: The author had clever phrases and did a good job writing, but why? Oscar Wilde and zombies? Is that even necessary? Talented writer, though. I should read more by this author."Eulogy to be Given by Whoever's Still Sober" by Nicole Cushing: This one is great, if just for the title alone. It made me want to read it. Then…what the hell just happened? Did the story just end like that? I didn't see that coming. Crazy, creepy story...almost like hearing banjos along the river that leads to Deliverance for a second.This was a mix of good and great stories, so I thin four stars is just right.

  • Rose
    2018-11-14 04:47

  • Holly Cave
    2018-10-18 05:49