Read Museum 123 by The Metropolitan Museum of Art Online

museum-123

In this simple and elegant counting book from the world's most renowned museum, numbers are introduced to children through masterpieces of art. Each number from one to ten has four pages devoted to it. First, readers are invited to search for how many of a certain object they can find in a single piece of art. Then, they turn the page to discover four different works illusIn this simple and elegant counting book from the world's most renowned museum, numbers are introduced to children through masterpieces of art. Each number from one to ten has four pages devoted to it. First, readers are invited to search for how many of a certain object they can find in a single piece of art. Then, they turn the page to discover four different works illustrating that number. Information about each piece of art and its creator appear in the back of the book. While kids practice counting, adults will love the cultural richness and educational value of this tour through the Metropolitan Museum's collection, from Ancient Egyptian tomb paintings and tenth century Iranian art to the work of Vincent Van Gogh and Homer Winslow....

Title : Museum 123
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780316160445
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 48 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Museum 123 Reviews

  • Jenny
    2018-10-07 01:07

    I loved this beautiful counting book featuring artwork from the Met. Each page starts with a question written partially in bold, colorful print...for example, "How many kittens follow their mother?" On the facing page is a piece of artwork. On the next page, there are four more small pictures of artwork that also share that same number and on the facing page the number written as a numeral and as a word. I appreciate that a wide variety of types of artwork (mask, quilt, paintings, embroidery, lithographs, even a detail from an Egyptian coffin) were included. I was also pleased to see that artists from many backgrounds were represented. It wasn't a perfect selection...no Central or South American artists, most pieces were pretty realistic (which makes sense...many surreal pieces of artwork would be hard to count objects), and more American artists than any other nationality. However, I still felt it was a great selection...and think it is wonderful for children to be exposed to so many types of art. I wish I could go visit the Met... and the Louvre...(Been to each one time and would love to go back.)

  • Chantee Jordan
    2018-10-05 05:05

    Museum 123 is a book that's suitable for the guided reader. The book uses several artistic styles and famous painting to help children learn to count. I found it difficult as an adult to follow some set of pictures and count how many of something once the pictures became more intricate. I enjoyed the various art styles and works but for a very young child of today it may be hard to keep their attention. At the same rate it's a great way to tie in history and give children an early appreciation of art.It may have been written for a young reader but the art used is definitely a reason as to why it may be suitable for maybe even a fifth grade reader. In the classroom one may choose to name all the artworks and highlight a specific artists or have the children do research on other similar styles. This book, written for counting, is otherwise a great teaching tool for the arts.

  • Asho
    2018-09-27 06:06

    My son has just learned how to count to ten. Well, sort of, he is mostly just reciting the numbers from rote memorization and seems to have no concept of what they mean yet. At any rate, he is really into counting, so on our most recent trip to the library we picked out several counting books. This one is really cool. It features paintings or details of paintings from the Metropolitan Museum of Art's collection to illustrate each number. I admired the different styles of paintings. My child was more interested in watching me point to and count the objects. ETA August 2016: We've checked this out of the library again. My son is now 4.5 and can easily count all of the objects, but still enjoys doing it. My toddler enjoyed looking at the pictures this time, too.

  • Dolly
    2018-10-05 00:21

    With a simple concept and beautiful pictures of artwork from the museum, this is a fun book to read with children. I explained to our girls that I expected they would find the book to be a bit babyish, but that I wanted to read it for my picture book club and that I thought they might like the artwork. I liked that five different images are shown for every number and each depicts the number in different ways. I also liked that different types and mediums of art are shown, from tapestries to photographs, from stained glass to a mask, from painted wood to woodblock prints, from lithographs to traditional oil on canvas paintings. A few of the images (especially the smaller pictures) were a bit sketchy on what object was being used to represent the number. It was not difficult for our girls to figure it out, but younger children might be a bit confused. I liked that it gave us an opportunity to dissect the different parts of each picture and a way to discuss the content, without merely looking passively at the images. Overall, we enjoyed getting a chance to see some artwork from the Metropolitan Museum of Art and discuss the different techniques, styles, and artists. Using the additional information in the back of the book, I quizzed the girls on the artists they've already studied, and talked briefly about some of the ones they haven't. Despite the 'counting book' format, we all really enjoyed reading this book together and I think it's a fantastic way to expose younger children to the world of art. This book was selected as one of the books for the August 2014 - Counting discussion at the Picture-Book Club in the Children's Books Group here at Goodreads.

  • Cameron Formichella
    2018-10-04 05:28

    In this simple and elegant counting book from the world's most renowned museum, numbers are introduced to children through masterpieces of art. Each number from one to ten has four pages devoted to it. First, readers are invited to search for how many of a certain object they can find in a single piece of art. Then, they turn the page to discover four different works illustrating that number. Information about each piece of art and its creator appear in the back of the book. While kids practice counting, adults will love the cultural richness and educational value of this tour through the Metropolitan Museum's collection, from Ancient Egyptian tomb paintings and tenth century Iranian art to the work of Vincent Van Gogh and Homer Winslow.

  • Elizabeth M
    2018-09-24 22:19

    I enjoyed this book very much. I really liked all the different illustrations. I enjoyed how even though the book only went up to counting to number ten, it still kept attention throughout because it had pictures that represented that number on each page. I also liked that on the page that revealed the number there were also pictures of random things showing the number. It made me really stop and look to see where in the picture were the objects that corresponded with the number. I think this book is great for children learning to count and is also challenging, in a good way, for them to find the random pictures that go with the number on the page. I really enjoyed this book.

  • Beverly
    2018-10-02 06:30

    Excellent selection of artwork of many types, and from a wide variety of diverse artists. The book is arranged in double-page spreads. On the left side of the spread is a question about how many of some object is in the photograph of the artwork, and on the right side is the photo of the artwork. Turn the page, and on the left side there are four smaller photos of additional artworks somehow matching the same number. On the right side is the number, very large, and underneath that, the number is written out. On the end pages, readers learn the title, artist, type of artwork, medium, and owner of each piece of art.

  • Katrina
    2018-10-06 06:18

    This is another one of those children’s art books I love so. It isn't the best book to learn numbers but the numbers are both written out and in numberical form and the art is wonderful. There are 4 art works for each number. In the back of the book given are: artist, name of the painting/piece, country, year/circa, and materials used. Each number corresponds with the contents of the four paintings (i.e. 2 = a picture of two dancing girls). It’s a great introduction to art and reinforces the numbers 1-10.

  • Kristine
    2018-10-21 04:19

    A counting picture book using items from The Metropolitan Museum of Art. I'm hoping that *one day* when Ellie and I make it there she'll already love the pictures and be excited that she recognizes some pieces.

  • Jim
    2018-10-02 23:29

    enjoyed this a lot, but could somebody tell me what there are seven of in the painting of the three people on the lower left?